John M. Braverman, S.J., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Disciplines Taught: Biology, Chemical Biology
Office: Science Center 127
Research Lab: Science Center 109
Phone: 610-660-1894
Fax: 610-660-1832
Email: jbraverm@sju.edu


Education

  • AB (1989) Princeton University
  • PhD (1995) University of California, Davis, CA

Professional Experience

  • Visiting Assistant Professor (2003-2006) Department of Biology, Georgetown University
  • Assistant Professor (2010- present) of Biology, Saint Joseph’s University

Courses Taught

Bioinformatics • Genetic and Evolutionary Biology • Evolution • Genome Science • God and Evolution

Publications

Freda, P., and J.M. Braverman.  2013. Drosophila suzukii, or Spotted Wing Drosophila, Recorded in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Entomological News, 123(1): 71–75.

Soria-Hernanz, D.F., O. Fiz-Palacios, J.M. Braverman, and M.B. Hamilton. 2008. Reconsidering the generation time hypothesis based on nuclear ribosomal ITS sequence comparisons in annual and perennial angiosperms. BMC Evolutionary Biology. 8: 344ff.

Soria-Hernanz, D.F., J.M. Braverman, and M.B. Hamilton. 2008.    Parallel rate heterogeneity in chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of Brazil nut trees (Lecythidaceae) is consistent with lineage effects. Molecular Biology and Evolution 25: 1282-1296.

Teodorovic, S., J.M. Braverman, and H.G. Elmendorf. 2007. Unusually low levels of genetic variation among Giardia lamblia isolates. Eukaryotic Cell 6: 1421-1430.

Lohmueller, K.E., M.M. Mauney, D. Reich, and J.M. Braverman. 2006. Variants associated with common diseases are not unusually differentiated in frequency across populations. American Journal of Human Genetics 78: 130-136.

Braverman, J.M., B.P. Lazzaro, M. Aguadé, and C.H. Langley. 2005. DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence at the erect wing and suppressor of sable loci of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Genetics 170: 1153-1165.

Hamilton, M. B., J.M. Braverman, and D.F. Soria-Hernanz. 2003. Patterns and relative rates of nucleotide and insertion/deletion evolution at six chloroplast intergenic regions in new world species of the Lecythidaceae. Molecular Biology and Evolution 20: 1710-1721.

Langley, C.H., B.P. Lazzaro, W. Phillips, E. Heikkinen, and J.M. Braverman. 2000. Linkage disequilibria and the site frequency spectra in the su(s) and su(wa) regions of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome. Genetics 156: 1837-1852.

Parsch, J., J.M. Braverman, and W. Stephan. 2000. Comparative sequence analysis and patterns of covariation in RNA secondary structures. Genetics 154: 909-921.

Chen, Y., D.B. Carlini, J.F. Baines, J. Parsch, J.M. Braverman, S. Tanda, and W. Stephan. 1999. RNA secondary structure and compensatory evolution. Genes & Genetic Systems 74: 271-286.

Stephan, W., L. Xing, D.A. Kirby, and J.M. Braverman. 1998. A test of the background selection hypothesis based on nucleotide data from Drosophila ananassae. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 95: 5649-5654.

Braverman, J.M., R.H. Hudson, N. Kaplan, C.H. Langley, and W. Stephan. 1995. The hitchhiking effect on the site frequency spectrum of DNA polymorphisms. Genetics 140: 783-796.

Braverman, J.M., B. Goñi, and H.A. Orr. 1992. Loss of a paternal chromosome causes developmental anomalies among Drosophila hybrids. Heredity 69:416-422.

Research

My main areas of research are: population genetics, molecular evolution, and bioinformatics. My goal is to characterize and explain genetic variation observed within natural populations and among species. I use empirical (field collection and laboratory) and computer modeling and DNA sequencing to test models of natural selection and their alternatives. I study rates and patterns of molecular divergence to test the molecular clock and identify the processes responsible. I design software to answer evolutionary questions about large genomic datasets. My study organisms range from Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans (two species of fruit fly) to tropical trees.


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