College of Arts & Sciences

GEP Lab Courses for Non-Majors

Courses and Faculty

St. Joseph’s University currently offers five lab-based natural science courses for non-science majors.   Listed below are the current course offerings and affiliated faculty.  Each faculty member’s name is linked to their University website and lists their teaching and research interests along with their contact information.

Each course has three fifty-minute lecture periods and a three-hour laboratory per week.

 

SPRING 2015 Courses:

Env106

Exploring the Earth (Environmental Science 106/106L)
Students in this course will learn about the scientific world view and experience the methods of science in the context of global climate change and environmental science.   Ecology, basic biology, chemistry, geology, and current events are used to examine the Earth and its changing climate.  Topics include sustainability, agriculture, alternative energy, biodiversity, natural resources, populations, pollution, ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles.

Affiliated faculty for Env 106/106L:

Dr. Jonathan Fingerut

Dr. Brian Forster

Dr. Clint Springer


Exploring the Living World (Biology 165/165L)
Students in this course will learn about the scientific world view and experience the methods of science in the context of the life sciences.  The course includes a survey of plant and animal life, an overview of bioenergetics, and selected topics in genetics and evolution.

Affiliated faculty for Bio165/165L:

Dr. Brian Forster

Dr. Edwin Li

 

Bio165L

Phy115

Investigations in Astronomy (Physics 115/115L)

Students in this course will learn about the scientific world view and experience the methods of science in the context of the science of astronomy.  Topics include the roles of observation, theory, philosophy, and technology in the development of the modern conception of the Universe. The Copernican Revolution, the birth and death of stars, our Milky Way galaxy, time, and our ancestral heritage in the cosmos will be discussed and explored.

Affiliated faculty for Phy115/115L:

Dr. Paul Angiolillo

Kathleen Hennessy, M.S.

Dr. Piotr Habdas

Additional courses: (NOT being offered in Spring 2015)

Phy113L

Exploring the Physical World (Physics 113 / 113L)
Students in this course will learn about the scientific world view and experience the methods of science in the context of the physical sciences and how they drive the behavior of weather.  It begins with an introduction to weather maps and the basic factors that drive the weather – solar radiation, temperature, air pressure, humidity, and Earth’s rotation.  Students see how these lead to winds, clouds, fronts, and various sorts of storms.  The course ends with a brief study of global climate and climate change.

Affiliated faculty for Phy113/113L:

Dr. Douglas Kurtze


Chemistry in Daily Life (Chemistry 115/115L)
This course explains the basic theories and need-to-know facts of scientific events one encounters in daily life from a chemistry perspective.  In addition to explaining the fundamental concepts of chemistry, the course will cover topics such as acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, household chemicals, nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, biochemistry, and drugs.

Affiliated faculty for Chm115/115L:

Dr. E. Peter Zurbach

 

Chem115