Faculty Tip

Holiday Season Could Cause Problems at the Workplace


The holiday season, with its heavy focus on religion, can spark awkward situations at the work place. This festive time of year has many workers wishing to spruce up their offices with holiday decorations, leaving employers to figure out how to regulate such religious expression.

Grammys Honor the Art – Not the Commerce – of Music -


Entertainment marketing expert Brent Smith, Ph.D., says that, despite the shift toward more popular music genres, the Grammy Awards should still be taken seriously by viewers as an event where artists are recognized for the quality of their work.

“To some degree, every brand must stay relevant with mainstream audiences,” says Smith. “Yet, the Grammys still represent the most respected awards show in the music industry because the nominees and winners are elected by their peers.”

A Beacon of Hope for Hunger Relief in Philadelphia


According to a recent census, Philadelphia’s poverty rate is “roughly double” the national figure. The city’s largest hunger-relief organization, Philabundance, estimates that 25.1 percent of Philadelphians are below the poverty line – a rate that is highest among the 10 biggest U.S. cities. To address this issue, a group of Saint Joseph’s University students and faculty partnered with Philabundance to develop a new food distribution model to reach Philadelphia’s hungry more efficiently.

Pepsi Ends Longtime Tradition of Super Bowl Ads


David Allan, Ph.D., an entertainment marketing expert and professor at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, says the big news this year about Super Bowl commercials is what viewers won’t see.

Pepsi, which has bought up commercial slots during the Super Bowl for more than 20 years, has opted out this time around, leaving the field open for other companies to make their move.

Homeland Security: A Personal Call to Action


Most Americans leave homeland security efforts to government officials and emergency responders. Paul Andrews, adjunct professor for Saint Joseph's University’s Criminal Justice and Public Safety Institute and a nationally recognized expert in homeland security, has a different view. He suggests individuals must do their own part in protecting our country.

Endangered Species: America's Heartland


According to Saint Joseph’s University sociologist Maria Kefalas, Ph.D., the heartland of America’s greatest export is no longer corn and wheat, but rather its young and talented people.

With one out of every five Americans still living in non-metropolitan areas, and considering that those areas now face natural decline with more deaths than births, the problem of the youth exodus from rural America is one that simply cannot be ignored.

At the Heart of Haiti, a Faith that Carries On


In times of crisis, every thought and action becomes a means of answering a basic question: “How will I survive?”

When the 7.0-magnitude earthquake devastated Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and its environs, many nations offered help – sending water, funds and manpower – slowly helping to answer this question for the people affected. Yet it may well be a resource the Haitian people possess within themselves that gets them through the greater turmoil: an unwavering, unquestioning faith.

To Avoid Spreading Germs, Expert Recommends Hand Washing


Fears of contracting the H1N1 virus this flu season have people steering clear of strangers with coughs and scolding friends who don’t sneeze into their crooked elbows. With everyone trying to stay germ free, hand sanitizer has become a popular means of protection. But although a quick pump from a Purell dispenser is the most convenient form of hand cleaning, is it the best?

This St. Patrick’s Day, Discover Hidden Irish Literary Gems


With shamrocks hung on doors and parade plans in the works, March is full of all things St. Patrick’s Day. Along with the festivities comes a curiosity about the culture they represent. A good way to get acquainted with the Irish is to pick up a novel by one of the island nation’s gifted authors.

Decoding the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act


On Nov. 21, 2009, Americans with a genetic medical condition will no longer live in fear of discrimination from their employers because of their unique genetic code. On that date, The Genetic Information Nondiscrimation Act (GINA) goes into effect, prohibiting employers from discriminating in terms of hiring, promotion, firing or any other terms and conditions of employment based on an individual’s genetic code.