Faculty Tip

In History Classes, the Play is the Thing


This fall, Jeffrey Hyson, Ph.D., assistant professor of history at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, will transform his freshman Western Civilization I classes into fascinating games. Hyson will use an innovative pedagogy developed at Barnard College called Reacting to the Past (RTTP).

Candy Culture: Cashing in on Halloween


According to the National Retail Federation, the average American will spend $66.28 on Halloween this year. Second only to costumes, candy eats up the largest chunk of this budget with American families spending an average of $22 each Halloween on confections.

Personal Connectors and Coaches for First-Year Students


A program connecting first-year students with non-academic advisors offers a personal connection at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia.  The Connectors Program is a two-year old program at the university partnering incoming students (connectees) with a staff member or administrator (connectors) for the duration of the student’s first academic year.

A Parent’s Guide to the Realities of College Drinking


Preparing to send a child to college can be a busy, nerve-wracking and emotional time for parents. They’ve invested much time and energy helping their child decide what college will work best academically and socially. They go shopping to buy all the dorm room essentials. But what most parents don’t spend enough time doing is preparing their child to deal with the reality of college drinking.

What NOT to Bring to College


A dorm room is a limited space. So while the flat screen, couch and love seat fit comfortably in the U-Haul, students may encounter challenges cramming all of that stuff into the new dorm.

Kim Allen-Stuck, Ph.D., is an administrator at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, where she counsels students on practical strategies for adjusting to college life.

Here are the list of items Allen-Stuck advises students NOT to bring to college this fall:

What’s Behind China’s Religious Resurgence?


The vast populace of China is experiencing a new purchasing power fueled by changing economic policies. Meanwhile, China watchers are reporting another lifestyle shift in the world’s third largest country: the resurgence of organized religion.

Educating Socially Engaged Environmental Scientists


This year, Earth Day falls on April 22, and for its 39th anniversary, the eco-minded among us will be taking stock of advancements made by the green movement, as well as the challenges that remain.

Inaccuracy and Bias: The Delicate Science of Polling


A recent post-election analysis by Nate Silver in his FiveThirtyEight blog measured the accuracy of polls leading up to midterm elections. His findings indicated not only inaccuracies from a number of polling organizations, but bias in their predictions. What causes these statistical slipups and polling prejudices? Is it the result of bias in polling organizations or an expected reality of predictive polling?

An “Intelligent” Approach for Strapped Businesses


With tight budgets and economic uncertainty, departments in corporations nationwide are becoming more accountable for measurement.

What If Your Child’s the Bully?


No parent wants to learn that their child is being bullied. But it may be even harder to hear that their child is the bully. What does a parent do when they’re told?

“Take a deep breath and don’t panic,” advises Sally Kuykendall, Ph.D., assistant professor of health services at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. “Resist the temptation to respond defensively with ‘not my child.’ Understand that your child may be testing behaviors.”