Chunrye Kim, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Office: Merion Hall 364
Phone: 610-660-3388
Fax: 610-660-2903
Email: ckim@sju.edu


Curriculum Vitae (CV)

Chunrye Kim earned her Ph.D. at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/Graduate Center, CUNY. Her primary research interests are victimology, domestic violence, and crime against vulnerable populations such as immigrants, children and sex trafficking victims. Her recent research focuses on the risk factors of intimate partner violence among Korean immigrants utilizing mixed methods and a case control design. In her research, Dr. Kim has found that the experience of childhood abuse victimization, acculturative stress, patriarchal gender role are the risk factors for becoming a victim of adult intimate partner violence. Dr. Kim’s previous works have been published in peer reviewed journals including Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Child Abuse and Neglect, Journal of Family violence, Sociological Forum and Sociological Perspectives. 

At John Jay College, Dr. Kim was a recipient of the Lewis Rudin Fellowship in Applied Justice Research at the Research and Evaluation Center, where she worked with numerous criminal justice agencies and community organizations in New York City to generate compelling evaluation evidence such as building data resources and improving administrative procedures. She was also managing editor of the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency (JRCD), one of the top journals in the field of criminal justice.

Education

John Jay College/Graduate Center, CUNY

  • Ph.D. in Criminal Justice
  • Dissertation Title: Investigating the Risk Factors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) among Korean Immigrant Women in America

Publications

PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Kim, C., & Schmuhl, M. (In press). Understanding intimate partner violence (IPV) in the Asian communities in America: A systematic review. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse.

Celinska, K., Sung, H-E., Kim, C., & Valdimarsdottir, M. (2018). An outcome evaluation of functional family therapy for court-involved youth. Journal of Family Therapy. DOI: 10.1111/1467-6427.12224

Kim. C. (2018). Religion, religious heterogeneity and intimate partner violence (IPV) among Korean immigrant women. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.DOI: 10.1177/0886260518757224

Adamczyk, A., Kim, C. & Schmuhl, M. (2018). Newspaper presentations of homosexuality across nations: Examining differences by religion, economic development, and democracy.  Sociological Perspectives, 61 (3), 399-425.

Kim, C. (2017). The impact of childhood victimization and patriarchal gender ideology on intimate partner violence among Korean immigrant women in the USA. Child Abuse & Neglect, 70, 82-91.

Adamczyk, A. Freilich, J. D., & Kim, C. (2017). Religion and crime: A systematic review and assessment of next steps. Sociology of Religion: A Quarterly Review, 78(2), 192-232.

Kim, C. & Sung, H-E. (2016). The effect of acculturation and intimate partner violence among Chinese immigrants in New York City.  Journal of Family Violence, 31(3), 325-336.

Kim, C. & Sung, H-E. (2016). Characteristics and risk factors of Chinese immigrant intimate partner violence victims in New York City and the role of supportive social networks. The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and Families, 24(1), 60-69.

Adamczyk, A., Kim, C. & Paradis, L. (2015). Investigating differences in how the news media views homosexuality across nations: An analysis of the United States, South Africa, and Uganda. Sociological Forum, 30(4), 1038-1058.

Chintakrindi, S., Porter, J., Kim, C., & Gupta, S. (2015). An examination of employment and earning outcomes of probationers with criminal and substance use histories in the Maricopa county study. SAGE Open, 1-19.